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route

The route directive adds a single route configuration to the application registry.

Attributes

pattern

The pattern of the route e.g. ideas/{idea}. This attribute is required. See Route Pattern Syntax for information about the syntax of route patterns.

Note

For backwards compatibility purposes, the path attribute can also be used instead of pattern.

name
The name of the route, e.g. myroute. This attribute is required. It must be unique among all defined routes in a given configuration.
factory
The dotted Python name to a function that will generate a Pyramid context object when this route matches. e.g. mypackage.resources.MyResource. If this argument is not specified, a default root factory will be used.
view
The dotted Python name to a function that will be used as a view callable when this route matches. e.g. mypackage.views.my_view.
xhr
This value should be either True or False. If this value is specified and is True, the request must possess an HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH (aka X-Requested-With) header for this route to match. This is useful for detecting AJAX requests issued from jQuery, Prototype and other Javascript libraries. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.
traverse

If you would like to cause the context to be something other than the root object when this route matches, you can spell a traversal pattern as the traverse argument. This traversal pattern will be used as the traversal path: traversal will begin at the root object implied by this route (either the global root, or the object returned by the factory associated with this route).

The syntax of the traverse argument is the same as it is for pattern. For example, if the pattern provided to the route directive is articles/{article}/edit, and the traverse argument provided to the route directive is /{article}, when a request comes in that causes the route to match in such a way that the article match value is ‘1’ (when the request URI is /articles/1/edit), the traversal path will be generated as /1. This means that the root object’s __getitem__ will be called with the name 1 during the traversal phase. If the 1 object exists, it will become the context of the request. Traversal has more information about traversal.

If the traversal path contains segment marker names which are not present in the pattern argument, a runtime error will occur. The traverse pattern should not contain segment markers that do not exist in the pattern.

A similar combining of routing and traversal is available when a route is matched which contains a *traverse remainder marker in its pattern (see Using *traverse In a Route Pattern). The traverse argument to the route directive allows you to associate route patterns with an arbitrary traversal path without using a a *traverse remainder marker; instead you can use other match information.

Note that the traverse argument to the route directive is ignored when attached to a route that has a *traverse remainder marker in its pattern.

request_method
A string representing an HTTP method name, e.g. GET, POST, HEAD, DELETE, PUT. If this argument is not specified, this route will match if the request has any request method. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.
path_info
The value of this attribute represents a regular expression pattern that will be tested against the PATH_INFO WSGI environment variable. If the regex matches, this predicate will be true. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.
request_param
This value can be any string. A view declaration with this attribute ensures that the associated route will only match when the request has a key in the request.params dictionary (an HTTP GET or POST variable) that has a name which matches the supplied value. If the value supplied to the attribute has a = sign in it, e.g. request_params="foo=123", then the key (foo) must both exist in the request.params dictionary, and the value must match the right hand side of the expression (123) for the route to “match” the current request. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.
header
The value of this attribute represents an HTTP header name or a header name/value pair. If the value contains a : (colon), it will be considered a name/value pair (e.g. User-Agent:Mozilla/.* or Host:localhost). The value of an attribute that represent a name/value pair should be a regular expression. If the value does not contain a colon, the entire value will be considered to be the header name (e.g. If-Modified-Since). If the value evaluates to a header name only without a value, the header specified by the name must be present in the request for this predicate to be true. If the value evaluates to a header name/value pair, the header specified by the name must be present in the request and the regular expression specified as the value must match the header value. Whether or not the value represents a header name or a header name/value pair, the case of the header name is not significant. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.
accept
The value of this attribute represents a match query for one or more mimetypes in the Accept HTTP request header. If this value is specified, it must be in one of the following forms: a mimetype match token in the form text/plain, a wildcard mimetype match token in the form text/* or a match-all wildcard mimetype match token in the form */*. If any of the forms matches the Accept header of the request, this predicate will be true. If this predicate returns false, route matching continues.

custom_predicates

This value should be a sequence of references to custom predicate callables. Use custom predicates when no set of predefined predicates does what you need. Custom predicates can be combined with predefined predicates as necessary. Each custom predicate callable should accept two arguments: info and request and should return either True or False after doing arbitrary evaluation of the info and/or the request. If all custom and non-custom predicate callables return True the associated route will be considered viable for a given request. If any predicate callable returns False, route matching continues. Note that the value info passed to a custom route predicate is a dictionary containing matching information; see Custom Route Predicates for more information about info.
view_context

The dotted Python name to a class or an interface that the context of the view should match for the view named by the route to be used. This attribute is only useful if the view attribute is used. If this attribute is not specified, the default (None) will be used.

If the view attribute is not provided, this attribute has no effect.

This attribute can also be spelled as view_for or for_; these are valid older spellings.

view_permission

The permission name required to invoke the view associated with this route. e.g. edit. (see Using Pyramid Security With URL Dispatch for more information about permissions).

If the view attribute is not provided, this attribute has no effect.

This attribute can also be spelled as permission.

view_renderer

This is either a single string term (e.g. json) or a string implying a path or asset specification (e.g. templates/views.pt). If the renderer value is a single term (does not contain a dot .), the specified term will be used to look up a renderer implementation, and that renderer implementation will be used to construct a response from the view return value. If the renderer term contains a dot (.), the specified term will be treated as a path, and the filename extension of the last element in the path will be used to look up the renderer implementation, which will be passed the full path. The renderer implementation will be used to construct a response from the view return value. See Writing View Callables Which Use a Renderer for more information.

If the view attribute is not provided, this attribute has no effect.

This attribute can also be spelled as renderer.

view_attr

The view machinery defaults to using the __call__ method of the view callable (or the function itself, if the view callable is a function) to obtain a response dictionary. The attr value allows you to vary the method attribute used to obtain the response. For example, if your view was a class, and the class has a method named index and you wanted to use this method instead of the class’ __call__ method to return the response, you’d say attr="index" in the view configuration for the view. This is most useful when the view definition is a class.

If the view attribute is not provided, this attribute has no effect.

use_global_views
When a request matches this route, and view lookup cannot find a view which has a ‘route_name’ predicate argument that matches the route, try to fall back to using a view that otherwise matches the context, request, and view name (but does not match the route name predicate).

Alternatives

You can also add a route configuration via:

See Also

See also URL Dispatch.

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